British Values & Apprenticeships

democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs”  This includes complying with the Equality Act 2010 and preventing discrimination against those with protected characteristics:  age;  disability;  gender reassignment;  marriage and civil partnership;  pregnancy and maternity;  race;  religion […]

democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance for those with different faiths and beliefs” 

This includes complying with the Equality Act 2010 and preventing discrimination against those with protected characteristics:

 age;

 disability;

 gender reassignment;

 marriage and civil partnership;

 pregnancy and maternity;

 race;

 religion or belief;

 sex;

 sexual orientation.

Behaviour in the workplace 

Effective learning takes place in the workplace and classrooms where there is tolerance and mutual respect as set out in the Equality Act and where those with the protected characteristics receive fair treatment, so that all are treated equally.

All providers should have a code of conduct which requires all student or apprentices to behave with tolerance and mutual respect of others. By maintaining these standards of behaviour in class teachers, lectures and trainers will be promoting British values Commercial success Mutual respect and tolerance are essential to success in the workplace. If your student or apprentices don’t show tolerance and mutual respect they will not work effectively with their colleagues and if they have contact with customers or clients they will find an alternative supplier if they are not treated with mutual respect and tolerance. This is an essential part of the training and education which student or apprentices need to prepare them for the workplace.

The Equality Act of 2010 also requires that no-one in the nine protected groups is discriminated against. There is case law which shows that the Equality Act rights are being enforced against businesses and the public sector.

Firstly Taken together these requirements suggest that providers of education and training should review their equality and diversity provision and their curriculum to ensure that it incorporates all these elements.

At the same time it is also important to make sure that the promotion of British values is consistent with the values, standards, policies and procedures of the learning organisation itself, since the ways these are implemented are frequently the ways in which an organisation demonstrates in practice its commitment to and delivery of values. Upholding British Values is about everybody accepting their responsibilities to uphold the values and standards which the learning community expects from all its members, insisting on appropriate standards of behaviour, challenging learners when their behaviour falls short of those standards, ensuring that all members of the learning community are safe, encouraging trainees to appreciate the standards expected in their vocational disciplines , to participate in representative structures, to develop employability skills and value difference.

But of course values, and more broadly smsc education, are also part of the mainstream training curriculum.

Vocational education and training is more than training in work-specific skills. In its broader sense it is about preparing trainees for their future roles as employees and employers. The curriculum should therefore also ensure learners are aware of the implications of cultural change and religious and non-religious beliefs for the services they will provide. A curriculum which prepares learners for employment in vocational disciplines needs to take account of the world in which they will be working. Trainees are not adequately prepared for work in a pluralist society, if they are not aware of the implications of culture, faith and belief for the services they will provide for customers and the teams in which they will work. There is more to employability than just achieving the vocational award. This may be more obvious in the curriculum content say in catering, hairdressing, or childcare than in other areas, but nevertheless it is essential for the development of personal skills, attitudes and behaviours for employability in all curriculum areas.

It is by recognising and ensuring the delivery of these elements of the training curriculum that training providers can best ensure that values are fully integrated into their provision.

John WiseChief Executive, fbfe

All FE and Training providers have to comply with the Prevent duty. This includes exemplifying and promoting British values in line with Ofsted expectations and also challenging extremism whenever it appears; many staff find this challenging.

The Equality, Diversity & Inclusion Conference

Why you should attend: The Equality, Diversity & Inclusion Conference 13th July, The Welcome Centre, Coventry.

Challenge your thinking about diversity, inclusion & Equality in apprenticeships.Business leaders tend to express an understanding of the rationale for diversity, inclusion & Equality, but how do we really make it happen

Come and learn/share how WE as a sector, can make real break-throughs in our diversity, inclusion & Equality thinking.

Come and challenge your thinking about your organisation’s approach AND COME away with impactful interventions.

Buy 3 Tickets and the 3rd person goes for free: = £66.00 per person. Tickets £99.00 per person




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